Quiet But Not Gone!

The Mamala tumblr has been quiet these past few weeks.
There exists the occasional post update, yet where is the personality behind the blog?

Right here, right now.

But in general, feeling a bit overwhelmed and under-energized.
Working hard at 2.5 jobs, moving to a new house in a week, and still attempting to pursue personal interests and relationships. In the great balancing act that is life, sadly, this blog sometimes gets the sour end of my attention. Very regrettable, I must make amends.

If anyone has a postpartum topic that is of interest to them, that they would like to see discussed on this blog, send a message my way! A bit of inspiration can go a long way :)

Cassady <3 


Oh the first postpartum visit…

This morning I am so so excited.
In one hour I will be having the first postpartum visit with the new parents I am currently working with.

Some highlights will include:

- Discussing and processing the birth experience
- Meeting the new baby!
- Setting up the bedroom with a diapering station, feeding station, and cleaning station for easy access.
- Discussing cesarean section recovery tips and looking over a book that I have on the subject
- Reviewing general babycare knowledge, such as breastfeeding, babywearing, and baby soothing.

Can’t wait!

 


Recovering from a Cesarean Birth?

Recovering from a Cesarean Birth (commonly known as a c-section) can be quite different from recovering from a vaginal delivery.

More time is spent in the hospital, usually around 4 days.
The length of postpartum physical recovery is lengthened while at home.
There is an emphasis put on rest and no moderate to heavy work.
Recovering from a Cesarean is like recovering from any major surgery. It can be frustrating to sit still with the excitement of a newborn, and discomfort can make regular tasks seem unmanageable.

Please keep in mind that the cis-gender nature of these articles/essays is representative of most of the available resources, and not of this blog, which strives for full gender representation. In fact, I could not find a single online source on recovering from a c-section as a transgender/gender non-conforming person, nor one with inclusive pronoun usage. Makes me think I need to write this article myself and do some real life, in person interviews! 

With these difficulties in mind, I have compiled a list of helpful web resources for recovering from a Cesarean Birth:

Recovering from a C-Section: What to Expect
http://www.americanpregnancy.org/pregnancyblog/2012/08/recovering-from-a-c-section-what-to-expect/

Helpful Hints After Cesarean Birth
http://www.womans.org/index.cfm?md=pagebuilder&pid=254

Most people do not choose to have a cesarean birth (though some do). It is often a choice made for health reasons, or out of necessity, or out of the urging of hospitals that have high cesarean rates. The following essay addresses the emotional aspects that may come with the loss of one’s original birth plan.
Loss of A Birth Plan
http://peaceoutofpieces.com/2013/06/11/the-loss-of-a-birth-plan/

Here is quite an in-depth article, from a parent-to-parent perspective
http://www.mumsnet.com/pregnancy/labour-and-birth/recovering-after-a-caesarean


One of my tumblr followers who reblogged this infograph made a good point, one that I feel is worth making an edit to this post about. And that is the way that Trans* is not a fully functional catch-all term, even in written word.
Though Trans* when utilized in articles, essays, and other writings tends to work as an inclusive term for speaking broadly about a variety of gender identities that do not fall under the cis-gender category. However, when spoken language is being utilized, or when speaking about specific individuals, Trans* does not truly function as a catch-all term. All of the language variations used to explain an individual&#8217;s gender exist for a reason, they are the word that each individual feels most comfortable with, and that they prefer. And this should be respected. 
One reason I like this infograph, and that I reposted it, is because it shows with nice imagery, the extremely diverse and detailed world of gender that exists. 

One of my tumblr followers who reblogged this infograph made a good point, one that I feel is worth making an edit to this post about. And that is the way that Trans* is not a fully functional catch-all term, even in written word.

Though Trans* when utilized in articles, essays, and other writings tends to work as an inclusive term for speaking broadly about a variety of gender identities that do not fall under the cis-gender category. However, when spoken language is being utilized, or when speaking about specific individuals, Trans* does not truly function as a catch-all term. All of the language variations used to explain an individual’s gender exist for a reason, they are the word that each individual feels most comfortable with, and that they prefer. And this should be respected. 

One reason I like this infograph, and that I reposted it, is because it shows with nice imagery, the extremely diverse and detailed world of gender that exists. 


A World Wide Movement For Single Mothers

S.M.O.O.T.H: Single Mothers Overcoming Our True Hurt

An acronym for single mothers, by single mothers.

This non-profit organization, formed in 2009, is dedicated to serving the needs of single mothers across the United States. S.M.O.O.T.H.’s facebook description reads:

S.M.O.O.T.H. is a nonprofit organization that aids in informing, impacting, and improving the lives of single mothers; mentally, physically, financially, spiritually. This organization has been on such a high demand, the Founder Betty Mayfield put together a tour to visit several cities throughout the United States to spread empowerment, parental education, and love. S.M.O.O.T.H. also has been invited to Paris France, Canada, and Uganda Africa to fulfill it’s mission in assisting single mothers. 

The Facebook group for S.M.O.O.T.H functions as it’s main organizing and news spreading outlet, and though it has only 400+ “likes”, S.M.O.O.T.H involves over 1,200 members world-wide. 

The Clarion Ledger reports:

The nonprofit raises money to help single mothers pay bills and purchase food, gas and clothing for their children. SMOOTH members also tour the country offering inspirational seminars and providing resources to those in need.
“Our motto is to inform, impact and improve the lives of single mothers, and that’s in every aspect of life,” Mayfield said. “We try to confront the totality of the single mother — make her a better person and help her become a better mother to her child.”

Are you, or do you know, a single mother who could benefit from contacting S.M.O.O.T.H? 
 


Parent & Baby Bonding

Parent/Baby bonding begins as soon as you meet your baby.
Bonding happens in hospitals, birth centers, and at home.
It happens for adoptive parents and birthing parents alike.

We live in a busy busy time and place. 
Expectant parents are often concerned that the first few days and weeks postpartum will be consumed by hectic task completion and social hosting, rather than by quiet bonding and time spent with baby. These are real concerns, but there are ways to address them and to claim the bonding time that all new parents and babies deserve.

Attachmentparenting.org lists 7 tips for bonding immediately postpartum in a hospital birth setting:

1. Delay routine medical procedures for a short period of time
2. Stay physically connected with the baby
3. Allow your baby the option to breastfeed/chestfeed right after birth
4. Room in with baby rather than sending them to the nursery
5. Have skin to skin contact with baby
6. Gaze at your newborn
7. Talk to your newborn 
(for in-depth article:  http://www.attachmentparenting.org/support/articles/artbonding.php)

Theadoptinguide.com shares story excerpts of ways that parents who have adopted newborns bonded with their babies. This particular story wonderfully shows the benefits of spending one on one time with your new baby, removed from the stressors of everyday life. For some parents, this is a luxury they are not able to obtain. If you are able to take that time, and create your own little world with the baby, even for one day, it can be an amazing bonding experience:

When I got a call saying there was a baby available, the due date was just days away, and it was a boy, I was worried. How would I bond? Could I be the single mother of a boy? On the plane to Hawaii, I was happy, but anxious. After we left the hospital, we were alone in a hotel room for about 10 days, and it was there that we really bonded. I gave him lots of kisses when bathing, feeding, and cuddling him. I talked to him constantly. I read to him. I told him I loved him about one hundred times a day. Two years later, he loves to hug and give kisses!
Sharon Werhel 
King of Prussia, Pennsylvania

(source: http://www.theadoptionguide.com/parents/articles/how-we-bonded)